Lead in paint

Lead is a highly toxic metal, pre-1960s white lead (lead carbonate) was the principal white pigment in primers and topcoats applied to wooden surface inside and outside homes and other buildings. Lead-based paints were widely used on many features of buildings including; doors, architraves, downpipes, window frames and sills, stairs and railings, skirting boards, weatherboards, door frames, barge boards and radiators.

Exposure to lead from paint can occur during the removal of lead-based paint as a result of inhaling dust/fume generated from the removal process or swallowing paint chips.

Elevated blood lead levels are associated with a range of adverse health effects including; fatigue, stomach ache, headache, anaemia, irritability, depression, decreased libido and forgetfulness with high levels of exposure leading to loss of coordination, convulsions, paralysis, coma and death.

Children are particularly susceptible to lead poisoning. Adverse effects on the intellectual and behavioural development of children have been reported at relatively low levels of exposure, sometimes as a result of exposure to leaded paint in house dust.

waves

In the UK, regulations now prohibit the use of lead paint in domestic properties, but leaded paint may still be present in houses built before the early 1990s. This is a particular hazard for those engaged in renovating older properties. Before any work is carried out on old painted surface, the lead content should be established.

The IOM can analyse paint fragments for lead content and advise on the best approach to take if lead is present. Complete the quick quote form below. 

Further information can be found here;

https://www.hse.gov.uk/construction/healthrisks/hazardous-substances/lead.htm

  • IOMworld Posted: 10 days ago
    Dedicated to making the world a healthier place for us all, IOM has recently collaborated on a pan-European human b… https://t.co/hxVffmOEXA
  • IOMworld Posted: 11 days ago
    IOM is delighted to have collaborated in the latest #Cities4Children evidence to action brief entitled 'Urban Air P… https://t.co/YjgWDqFTv1
  • IOMworld Posted: 16 days ago
    Protect your workers hearing from excessive noise in the workplace. HSE states that 17,000 people in the UK suffer… https://t.co/xE1rkLrW45
  • IOMworld Posted: 19 days ago
    RT @lohmir: Millions of children suffer from #AirPollution in low and middle income countries. Read more about actions that could be taken…
  • IOMworld Posted: 19 days ago
    Protect your workforce against risks from hazardous workplace dust. Thousands of workers are made ill by occupation… https://t.co/8JsMrjt2M7
  • IOMworld Posted: one month ago
    IOM is delighted to announce that @HSE has awarded us to carry out a study on understanding the behavioural factors… https://t.co/qvnsOv7tjv
  • IOMworld Posted: one month ago
    We are looking to appoint Governors (Trustees) who can bring a wealth of knowledge and expertise that will support… https://t.co/eyAq1s7bag
  • IOMworld Posted: one month ago
    Changes are coming for the IOM website and we would value your feedback. Help us by completing our survey:… https://t.co/gETHLSyyCj
  • IOMworld Posted: one month ago
    Make sure you are staff are complying to COSHH regulations about Respirator Protection Equipment (RPE). Sign up to… https://t.co/gvKHz9Gkyk
  • IOMworld Posted: one month ago
    We are looking for a Lead Authorising Engineer to join our team at IOM. You will deliver technical expertise, drive… https://t.co/dEN8lFsMmZ