Microbiological monitoring

HTM03-01 requires ‘at wound site’ monitoring under UCV canopies following validation to determine the level of colony forming units / cubic metre. We specialise in at 'wound site' monitoring using a combination of Casella airborne bacteria sampler (ABS) and sterile silicone tubing.

The silicone tubing is pre-sterilised in the CSSD prior to the monitoring. The surgeon places one end of the tube within 300mm of the wound site and the other end is passed to our microbiologist outside the clean zone of the UCV canopy.  The tube is connected to the Casella ABS and sampling takes place once the first incision is made until the closing of the wound.

This involves using several sampling plates each exposed to 10.5m3 of air over a 15 minute period. Peripheral sampling locations under the canopy are also monitored during the theatre list.

Following monitoring, the sample plates are incubated and enumerated by IOM in our UKAS accredited microbiological laboratory.

At wound site, monitoring is frequently undertaken to provide assurance that the UCV canopy and clinical procedures are effective in controlling the level of bacteria at wound sites particularly deep wounds such as occur during orthopaedic hip and knee replacement surgery. 

Contact: Alison Parton, 01785 333215, or complete our contact form below.

 

Events
20 October
2021
In partnership with the ICBA

Particles and Health 2021

  • 20 October 2021
  • Running from the 20.10.21 to 21.10.21

IOM is proud to be sponsoring the Particles and Health conference, a two day event designed for regulators and researchers to:

  • Address scientific studies regarding human health effects of PSLTs. The value of human studies over animal studies-when human-exposed populations can be studied adequately- will be emphasized.
  • Review and discuss definition of PSLT’s proposed at Edinburgh workshop and published in 2020 in the Journal Inhalation Toxicology with attention to both similarities and differences among these substances.
  • Address translational toxicology challenges, including the appropriateness of rats as models for human lung pathogenesis (particularly lung cancer) in light of lung overload phenomena and species differences.
  • Serve as a platform to present current scientific information about PSLTs important for regulatory action.
  • Publication of pertinent conference presentations in the peer reviewed scientific literature will allow the presentations to live beyond the conference and subsequently be reviewed part of regulatory deliberations.
  • Establish an interdisciplinary setting for industry, academia and regulatory professionals to interact on an important topic. Such interaction can facilitate enhanced understanding of the science and appropriate classification, labelling and setting exposure limits, among others.
  • Recommend areas for further research regarding the significance of the rat as a model for translation toxicology. 
  • Review the biokinetics of inhaled nanoparticles and the potential for non-pulmonary effects.

For more information and tickets please visit the Particles and Health website here.

Event info
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